Tag Archives: implant supported dentures

How to Spot the Difference Between Fake and Genuine Clear Choice Reviews

I’ve been trying to compare a bunch of Clear Choice reviews and testimonials from other local offices. I’m looking to be free of my upper denture after having it for about five years and I’m pretty sure I want to go the route of an implant-supported denture for stability and comfort. The next step comes in with trying to find the right dentist to do it and getting some estimates, but I’d rather not waste anybody’s time by going someplace that isn’t going to provide good care. I don’t know anyone who has had this procedure done, so I can’t get referrals from anyone, which means I’m more or less at the mercy of the net. The problem is, as I look over all these Clear Choice reviews, they’re all over the place. I can’t help but wonder if some of them are trumped up or fake. I know this happens on places like Amazon, but I don’t know if it has made its way into things like dentistry. Are there any things I can look for that may help me determine if something is valid?

Thank you,
Erin – Illinois

Dear Erin,

The reality is that Clear Choice reviews are going to be all over the place. Some people have good experiences, but when it goes bad, it goes really, really bad. This seems to be more because of their model than anything else. They do one main type of treatment and push it hard. Their sales techniques and cookie cutter methodology obviously can’t work for everyone.

Be sure to look at all dental implant and implant supported options. Don’t limit yourself to Clear Choice.

As far as spotting fake Clear Choice reviews (or any others for that matter), it’s really hard for people to tell. There are some computer programs that swear they can do it, but even those aren’t great. However, you may be able to identify them by looking out for the following:

1) Focus on people, not actions, or lots of generalizations. For example, if someone just keeps saying “I liked the dentist” repeatedly, it’s a red flag. Real testimonials tend to focus on the procedures performed and how they went. The person writing can tell you exactly what was good or bad, not just say “The dentist did a good job with my implant.”

2) We wary of large amounts of technical language. Testimonials that include things like the clinical names of teeth (bicuspid, first molar, etc.), those that use medical language to describe parts of the mouth (anterior, posterior, mesial, distal), or ones that sound like the info is coming from a manual (35% tooth whitening gel, fine polishing disc, etc.) Some patients are well informed and that’s great, but real patients don’t usually distinguish between different types of similar materials/ equipment and almost never use dental terminology to describe landmarks in their mouth. Use your own judgment with these.

3. No other reviews. If you’re on a platform where it’s common to have reviews of all sorts, like Yelp, be wary of the ones who never rate anything else or those who only give 5-star ratings to everyone.

4. Improbable or overexcited claims. For example, “THIS DENTIST IS AWESOME!!!” or “One visit with this dentist and all my dental problems were fixed.”

While there’s no fail-safe method for detecting fibs, these tips can help sort out the suspicious reviews.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Brad Hylan.

Bad experience with Clear Choice.

My teeth had continually deteriorated. I was embarrassed to smile and had lost so many teeth I was having trouble eating. The time had come for me to get a full mouth replacement with dental implants. I was drawn to Clear Choice Dental Implant Centers because I saw a commercial on tv. They told me to attend a seminar, which I did. And in hindsight, that whole deal was all smoke and mirrors. I was told that I was a “perfect candidate” and all the glitz at the seminar sold me on the spot. I ended up paying Clear Choice over $4K for all-on-four implant-retained denture. This was their “teeth-in-a-day” offer and I was convinced I truly was the “perfect candidate.”

What they should have called the procedure was “dentures-in-a-day” because I basically had a mouth full of plastic. It turns out at a cleaning it was discovered that the implants were not placed where my teeth once were. And I also found out that they could have used my natural teeth to better secure everything but they didn’t. I was so mad when I found out they removed my natural teeth and they didn’t have to. I called and asked for my money back, and of course the answer was no way! I feel suckered and know this post won’t change anything. But if by chance there is someone like me out there, please, please, please reconsider spending so much money. Go to a reputable implant dentist. Don’t make my mistake!

– Jerry in Georgia

Jerry,

Thank you for your willingness to share your experience. The all-on-four technique is quite popular among Clear Choice Dental Implant Centers. They extract all your remaining teeth and to the implant-retained denture. Every Clear Choice Center is different, but thank you for sharing your story. Every dentist has differing philosophies, but you should have been presented with more than one option in your circumstance. Sorry about your experience.

This post is sponsored by Cleveland implant dentist Hylan Dental Care.

I have dental implants, can they support a denture?

I think it is time for me to get a new denture. I also have dental implants. Do you think my existing dental implants can be used to support the new denture? Or do they need to be removed and do I need to get new ones? Any insight you have would be greatly appreciated.

– Lawrence in Louisiana

Lawrence,

It all depends on the current condition of your dental implants. If they are in relatively good condition than it is possible to use them in support of your complete dentures. It is very difficult to make an assessment or make any specific recommendations without having actually seen you in person.

The dentist will need to perform a CT scan to evaluate your existing dental implants. The placement will be assessed and it will be imperative to confirm that there is favorable bone density to continue in the support of your implants and denture. The location of the existing dental implants will also be a factor in the design of your new dentures. There may be some limitations in the design parameters based on exactly where the implants are currently placed.

Make sure you consult with a credentialed and proven implant dentist. He or she will be able to give you more personalized recommendations, as well as provide your options to secure the denture.

This post is sponsored by Cleveland dentist Hylan Dental Care.